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November 09, 2007

Reasoning for Reruns

If you own a TV, you've surely heard of the writer's strike or at least seen the toll that it's taken on shows.  A good majority of shows that have run this week have been reruns or the final show or two before reruns begin.  Here's a quick video put together by the Writers Guild of America explaining why they're on strike.  It will be interesting to see how this affects the industry in the coming weeks.  Thanks to Colin at Canuckflack for the video. -- John Herrington

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Comments

Nice video. I would love to see what the lead actor's residuals typically are on that same pie chart.

Good for them for using the influence they have by banding together. A few outcomes are possible:

If they don't get what they want:
1. The writers have to seek employment elsewhere, blessing productive society with their smarts.
2. TV sucks even more.
3. People watch TV less, but
4. They could watch more (which has its own consequences).
5. The influence of celebrities in Hollywood shrinks (Woo hoo!)


If they get what they want:
1. They get paid fairly for their work, assuming the prices are fair.
2. TV sucks no less than it does now.
3. TV viewing habits stay the same.
4. Celebrity influence stays the same (boo!)

IMO, the entire industry is skewed horribly in favor of a few actors and producers at the expense of everyone else whose contribution is indispensable to the success of a product.

If TV entertainment went away, I wonder if I'd miss it.

I'd support the agreement with one stipulation. The writers for High School Musical 3 should be permanently on strike and be forced to listen to the album multiple times every day.

Then they would know my pain.

Paul

I wonder how much of that residual pie the key grips make. Anyone know?

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