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June 20, 2008

The most important thing you can learn today.

Go here. Watch the spots. Read the comments. Yes. Each one.

Go here. Read the brilliant post written by the Alan formerly known as Tangerine Toad.

No need to thank me.

But if you insist, I'll consider it thanks enough if you apply what you learned. The more agencies act like contractors, the more clients look at agencies as contractors. You'll never get out of the basement if you aren't willing to turn on the light and find the stairs. - Cam Beck

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Comments

Cam: Thanks so much for calling this out. You 100% get it and why this is such a great illustration of what's wrong these days.

The Brits take their advertising far more seriously than we do - the creative end, anyway-- but I was still taken aback by the whole "the product doesn't matter so long as the ad is cool" approach.

Thanks again.

Cam,

Reading every comment was TORTURE. I know my cozy little community at MCE is special, but sometimes I forget just how special, because many of us run around being special at other fine blogs too, so I see a lot of special. I could not let the comments get like that if I were Scamp.

I did it, and I'm glad. Funny how I didn't fully understand what you meant by "contractor" until I endured all the torture (and of course, TT's fine commentary on all that commenting both there and at his own place.

Strategy, design, and how about accountability or personal responsibility. It seemed like many of the folks at Scamp's blog felt that take the money and run is a fine answer for an agency.

Watch your client take the business and run if all you do is fulfill orders and not become a valued part of the client's team.

So, thank you. That's a harsh way to re-learn the lesson, but it was memorable and I appreciated it.

Regards,

Kelly

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